Transfer patients, not pathogens

May 6, 2016
safe patient transfer

In the course of a hospital stay, a patient may be transferred one, two, or multiple times. While necessary for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions, patient transfers can also lead to the transfer of infectious agents. Pathogens, including resistant, hard-to-treat bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile, may be passed from patient to caregiver, then from caregiver to other patients.1,2

Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) like these are a growing and dangerous threat, sickening hundreds of thousands of patients a year and responsible for more than 75,000 deaths.3

Positioned for Protection

Because bacteria and viruses can thrive on common hospital materials and fabrics4, choosing antimicrobial positioning products can reduce the risk of infection by killing germs before they have a chance to spread. AliMed is a leader in advanced infection control solutions for hospitals and other healthcare settings. AliMed's Antimicrobial-Treated Gait Belts are infused with silver ion technology, one of the most potent and safest antimicrobials available5, and are designed to inhibit the growth and spread of bacteria, mold, yeasts, and fungi for the life of the product. AliMed’s Protecta-Coat™ Antimicrobial Surfaces also feature ionic silver protection. In addition, the durable vinyl coating is seamless and impervious to fluids. For optimum protection during patient lifting, AliMed’s Disposable Single Patient Lifter Slings help reduce cross-contamination at a fraction of the cost of reusable nylon slings.

Learn more about AliMed’s positioning products and other infection control solutions.

Disinfect and Protect

AliMed’s line of disinfectants, wipes, and other cleaning products make it quick and easy to protect any environment from dangerous pathogens.

References:

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3950432/
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11842989
  3. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/hospital-acquired-infections/index.htm
  4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC86187/
  5. http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/articles/2010/11/the-science-of-antimicrobial-silver-from-hieroglyphs-to-hais.aspx